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Archive for the ‘Population Health’ Category

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In the past, I’ve written quite a few blog posts about the importance of health systems partnering with community and public health organizations to positively impact community and population health. Here are a few examples:

Engaging Public and Community Organizations to address Social Determinants of Health, December 13, 2016

Public Health 3.0, October 5, 2016

Organizations Collaborating to Advance Population Health (Video), July 13, 2016

Replicate This: A Hospital Sponsored Community Blog, May 5, 2016

Population Health Management Is Our Future, March 15, 2016

Population Health: An Informal Conversation with National Leaders, April 21, 2015

One Year of Public Health & Primary Care Working Together, March 5, 2015

Clearly, this is an area in which I have a strong interest; so when I find a person or organization who shares my passion, I get excited; I see hope!

To that end, earlier this week I found the following passage on Renown Health’s website, and I was elated. They get it! This statement clearly articulates a vision of community health that I share and often promote within this blog (as you can see from the list of blog posts above).

Together, We’re Better

“As the healthcare landscape continues to evolve, we will broaden our approach, and think not only about healthcare, but also about health. And, we will think beyond the walls of the hospital and take our services and winning spirit out into our communities.

We recognize that we all must come together if we are to really move the needle on our community health statistics and improve the overall health of our community. To accomplish these lofty goals, we are forging new partnerships with doctors, nonprofits, other hospitals, and those who are educating tomorrow’s workforce — just to name a few. We will leave no stone unturned in our quest to think differently and focus on what’s really important. And, we won’t forget our most significant partnerships — the one we share with our 6,000+ employees. The good work we do would not be possible without them.” (Renown Health Website)

It was wonderful to discover a healthcare organization that is embracing this perspective. I believe much of this philosophy comes from Dr. Tony Slonim, Renown’s CEO. He is an amazing guy and a model physician leader. If you’re not familiar with Dr. Slonim, I’ll give you some highlights. Dr. Slonim is a Clinical Professor of Medicine and Pediatrics at the University of Nevada School of Medicine (UNSOM). He is a board certified physician in Internal Medicine, Pediatrics, and Critical Care, and a Doctor of Public Health. Dr. Slonim is a nationally recognized expert in patient safety, accountable care, healthcare quality, and innovative care delivery models focused on improving health in the community. He is an academic leader with more than 100 publications, 15 textbooks and more than $2 million in National Institutes of Health funding to his name. Dr. Slonim serves on the boards of the American College of Physician Executives, the Stevens Institute of Technology, and is the Chairman of the Certified Medical Representatives (CMR) Institute Boards.

I first met Dr. Slonim through an article in the The American Journal of Managed Care (AJMC) where he was interviewed about Physician Leadership. As I read that interview, I was engaged by his perspective on the health system’s role in addressing community health.

“We’re on a quest toward a healthy community, and that means we’re looking outside of our walls not only to healthcare and the healthcare we provide, but also ensuring the community’s health. How are we there not only when they’re sick or injured, but when they have questions about what vitamins or herbals to take? When they need support on how to reduce their stress or how to lose weight or stop smoking? Those are the ways that we need to engage the community with prevention and wellness. And we’re doing that a lot more aggressively than we ever have.” (AJMC, March 14, 2016)

After doing a little digging, I found Dr. Slonim’s TEDx Talk where he continues to address the theme of creating healthier communities. I’ve embedded that video below.

In short, Dr. Slonim and I share a common belief that community health needs to be addressed in the community – and that this is best done through partnerships between the health system and community/public health organization. For me, it was so gratifying to discuss a physician leader and health system that is embracing that philosophy!

Here’s the backstory: This week one of my colleagues and I spent a couple of days in Reno, Nevada visiting the marketing team at Renown Health. During my time at Renown, I was fortunate to spend time with their CEO, Dr. Tony Slonim.

For those of you who haven’t heard of Renown, it is a not-for-profit integrated healthcare network serving a 17-county region comprised of northern Nevada, Lake Tahoe and northeast California. It is one of the region’s largest private employers with a workforce of more than 5,700. Renown’s network includes three acute care hospitals, a rehabilitation hospital, skilled nursing, and the area’s most comprehensive medical group and urgent care network. Of the 5,627 hospitals in the United States, Renown is one of only 281 physician-led organizations.

We left Renown with a great appreciation for the organization and its commitment to addressing community health. The health of our communities is dependent upon hospitals and health systems moving beyond their walls, and partnering with community organizations. It was wonderful to learn that the team at Renown embraces this perspective.

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Early this week, my colleague, Kate Gillmer, and I were invited by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to sit in on a webinar where they formally launched their new initiative – Health Impact in 5 Years (HI-5). The HI-5 or “High-Five” initiative highlights a list of non-clinical, community-wide approaches with a proven track record. Each intervention listed is associated with improved health within five years and is reported to be cost-effective or cost-saving over the lifetime of the population or even earlier. Public and private organizations can use this list to quickly assess the scientific evidence for short-term health outcomes and overall cost impacts of community-wide approaches.

With its emphasis on community-wide approaches, HI-5 complements CDC’s 6|18 Initiative, which focuses on 18 traditional and innovative clinical interventions for six high-burden conditions. Together, HI-5 and 6|18 provide public health, health care, and a diverse array of other sectors with evidence across the continuum of prevention and care.

As you can see in the graphic below, HI-5 is focused on non-clinical, community-wide public health interventions for population health improvement – those interventions that have the greatest potential for impact on health because they reach entire populations of people at once and require less individual effort than clinical interventions.

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HI-5 highlights two types of public health interventions: 1) Those that help to change the context by making the healthy choice easier, and 2) interventions addressing the social determinants of health.

Interventions Changing the Context:

School-Based Programs to Increase Physical Activity
School-Based Violence Prevention
Safe Routes to School
Motorcycle Injury Prevention
Tobacco Control Interventions
Access to Clean Syringes
Pricing Strategies for Alcohol Products
Multi-Component Worksite Obesity Prevention

Interventions Addressing the Social Determinants of Health:

Early Childhood Education
Clean Diesel Bus Fleets
Public Transportation: System Introduction or Expansion
Home Improvement Loans and Grants
Earned Income Tax Credits
Water Fluoridation

For more information on the HI-5 initiative, go to http://www.cdc.gov/HI5.

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Screen Shot 2016-07-07 at 12.20.49 PMI’ve written about the BUILD Health Challenge in the past. You can see my prior post by clicking here. The BUILD Health Challenge is an initiative designed to foster and expand meaningful partnerships among health systems, community-based organizations, local health departments, and other organizations that impact health in the community.

The Advisory Board Company, the de Beaumont Foundation, the Colorado Health Foundation, The Kresge Foundation, and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation have teamed up to improve community health and promote health equity through this effort. Overall, they seek to catalyze meaningful progress toward total population health. An important aspect of this effort is addressing the upstream factors that impact health. Often referred to as the social determinants of health, they include factors as diverse as early childhood development, economic opportunity, regulation and policy, the built environment, transportation and infrastructure, educational attainment, public safety, and housing.

While attending the Practical Playbook’s National Meeting in May, several participants in the BUILD Health Challenge (grantees) were recorded on video, speaking about their local initiatives. These videos do an amazing job capturing the essence of the BUILD Health Challenge. The examples of collaboration to improve the health of populations within these communities are outstanding. It is also great to hear how these organizations are directly addressing the social determinants of health! The first time I viewed these videos I knew that I would want to share a few of them on my blog. So, here you go.

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Screen Shot 2016-05-20 at 7.55.57 AMAfter a day and a half of the Practical Playbook National Meeting, I am blown away by the activity on Twitter. Heading into the conference, I had no idea what to expect. The people attending this conference are not marketers (the folks I usually interact with on social media). For the most part, these are public health professionals, people who work for community organizations and government agencies, foundation professionals and clinicians employed by health systems. Let me tell you, the digital engagement has been impressive.

Heading into our the final day of #PPBMeeting, there have been 195 individuals Tweeting with the conference hashtag. I believe there are 330+ people attending the National Meeting. These individuals have generated 1,616 Tweets for a total of 2,391,582 potential impressions. See some of the Twitter analytics below, provided by Symplur.

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On Sunday morning I’m heading to Bethesda, Maryland to attend the Practical Playbook National Meeting (#PPBMeeting). It’s a conference dedicated to bringing public health and primary care professionals together, facilitating collaboration, for the purpose of driving improvements in population health. Jennings‘ digital engagement staff is part of the social media team for the conference. We’ll be Tweeting (@pracplaybook, @JenningsHealth, @dandunlop, @physicianfocus) live from all the sessions, sharing content in real time. We’ll also maintain a storify to curate the social media content. I’ll post that link as soon as it is available.

Here’s some background information on the National Meeting:

“The Practical Playbook National Meeting will be a milestone event towards advancing robust collaborations that improve population health. By bringing together key stakeholders from across sectors – representing professional associations, community organizations, government agencies and academic institutions – the National Meeting will help to catalyze a national movement, accelerate collaborations by fostering skill development, and connect like-minded individuals and organizations to facilitate the exchange of ideas to drive population health improvement.” (PPB National Meeting Website)

We’ll be on site Sunday through Tuesday. Please follow along using the conference hashtag: #PPBMeeting. I’m very excited to be a part of this conversation over the next few days. This is exactly where our focus needs to be. I hope you’ll join us. For more information on the Practical Playbook, go to https://www.practicalplaybook.org/.

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As we adjust to this new healthcare ecosystem, I am more convinced than ever that one of the keys to population health improvement is collaboration between healthcare organizations, community organizations and local public health organizations. Population health is not a challenge that is solved in the physician’s office. Nor are the social determinants of health easily addressed in a clinical setting. I’ve written about this in past blog posts. Much of my firm’s work with the Practical Playbook involves encouraging collaborations for improved population health.

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Today I am excited to announce that a project I’ve dreamed about for the last 16 months has now come to fruition! 16 months ago Leah Hollenberger (VP, Development, Marketing & Community Relations, Copley Hospital, Morrisville, VT) and I came together with a shared vision for a hospital sponsored blog that brings in representatives of various community organizations as contributing bloggers. Just last week we launched the Live Well Lamoille blog. (Kate Rudy, a digital engagement specialist at Jennings, has been instrumental in leading this project.) Contributors to the blog include:

Our bloggers include:

Caleb Magoon, Power Play Sports and Waterbury Sports
David Vinick, Copley Hospital
Jessica Bickford, Healthy Lamoille Valley
Leah Hollenberger, Copley Hospital
Lisa Mugford, The North Central Vermont Recovery Center
Lynda Marshall, Lamoille County Mental Health Services
Mary Collins, Lamoille Home Health & Hospice and The Manor
Michele Whitmore, Johnson State College
Nancy Wagner, Copley Hospital
Rorie Dunphey, Family Practice Associates – Cambridge
Scott Johnson, Lamoille Family Center
Steve Ames, Building Bright Futures
Todd Thomas, Town of Morristown
Tricia Follert, Town of Morristown
Valerie Valcour, Morrisville Department of Health

This is such an impressive list because representatives of these community organizations are coming together to share relevant health content with area residents. And it is all happening under the Copley Hospital umbrella. This is emblematic of the future of healthcare in communities across our country. It is about organizations coming together, united in their desire to improve population health. At its most basic level, preventing chronic disease is the best first step in this effort. And you do that through outreach to the communities we serve and by taking a hard look at upstream challenges in those communities that negatively impact health (poor housing conditions, lack of access to fresh/nutritious foods, etc).

I invite you to visit Copley Hospital’s fledgling blog. We are just getting started and I am so excited about the potential of this initiative.

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Screen Shot 2016-05-02 at 11.47.25 AMJust last week, one of my firm’s clients, The Practical Playbook, launched a LinkedIn Group dedicated to the sharing of resources and facilitation of conversations around population health improvement. The group is titled: “Working Together for Population Health.” For those of you who now work at hospitals and health systems across the country, population health management is in our future, and is a reality today for many of us. Here’s the group description from LinkedIn:

“Public health and primary care are natural, foundational partners for addressing the challenges in today’s health system. Together, along with other partners, we can improve population health. The Practical Playbook will share guidance and lead discussions to advance population health partnerships.”

I invite you to head over to the LinkedIn Group and introduce yourself. We look forward to your input. By joining the discussion group, you will:

  • Find practical, actionable advice to help you identify potential partners and implement projects
  • Ask questions and share resources with a diverse group of colleagues
  • Read the latest thought leadership from collaboration experts
  • Connect with colleagues and gain insight into other sectors

 

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