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Posts Tagged ‘The Practical Playbook’

I’ve been reading and hearing a lot about Public Health 3.0. If I’m hearing a lot about it, I figure others must be as well. What is it and why is it important? In this blog post I plan to address those questions and provide links to resources that can given you a greater depth of information on the subject.

My understanding of Public Health 3.0, in very simple terms, is that it is a reaction to the recognition that addressing the social determinants of health will require the involvement of an increased number of stakeholders, pooling of resources and multi-sector collaboration, leading to greater innovation in the ways we address these challenges to population health improvement.

The key components of Public Health 3.0 are enhanced public health leadership in the community, broad engagement with partners across multiple sectors, an accreditation process that includes Public Health 3.0 elements, more timely and locally relevant data, new metrics of community health and more flexible public health funding. The HHS Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health is leading the Public Health 3.0 initiative, which will build off ongoing Healthy People 2020 efforts that encourage collaboration across sectors and communities.” (Source: The Nation’s Health, “Social determinants take center stage in call for Public Health 3.0”)

On the Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion website (Health.gov), the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health on Public Health 3.0 has established a blog (Public Health 3.0 in Action) to provide regular updates showcasing examples of Public Health 3.0. The blog take Public Health 3.0 out of the theoretical realm, giving current real world examples of this approach in practice.

Why do we need Public Health 3.0? Why is it important?

Despite public health’s increasing focus on how environments impact health, our ZIP codes remain a more accurate determinant of health than our genetic codes. As a society, we have a collective responsibility to create conditions that allow all members of our communities to make healthy choices. And yet public health initiatives often exist in silos, resulting in missed opportunities to leverage the critical knowledge of communities to improve health at the local level.” (Source: HealthyPeople.gov)

The historic lack of collaboration between public health organizations, healthcare systems, community organization and private enterprise has always puzzled me. Public Health 3.0 seeks to change that prevailing paradigm by calling for cross-sector collaboration and innovative solutions. It’s an exciting initiative that is provoking conversations and action!

For more information on Pubic Health 3.0, here are some resources I recommend:

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Earlier this week I wrote a post about Duke University School of Medicine’s new Center for Population Health Sciences. My premise was that, as healthcare marketers, we are all going to be in the population health promotion business sooner or later. So we need to start paying attention!

Screen Shot 2016-03-15 at 3.01.18 PMTo that end, my team and I have front row seats on the population health management express. We’ve spent the last year working with The Practical Playbook, a collaboration of the De Beaumont Foundation, the CDC, and Duke’s Department of Community and Family Medicine. The Practical Playbook exists to encourage, inform and facilitate collaboration between public health organizations and healthcare organizations (hospitals, health systems, primary care providers) with the ultimate goal of positively impacting population health. This spring the Practical Playbook is holding its first ever National Meeting, May 22 – 24, at the Hyatt Regency, Bethesda, MD.

“The Practical Playbook National Meeting will be a milestone event towards advancing robust collaborations that improve population health. By bringing together key stakeholders from across sectors – representing professional associations, community organizations, government agencies and academic institutions – the National Meeting will help to catalyze a national movement, accelerate collaborations by fostering skill development, and connect like-minded individuals and organizations to facilitate the exchange of ideas to drive population health improvement.” (National Meeting Website)

My belief is that this conference will spend more time on the “how” of population health management through collaboration, rather than the “why.”  Attendees should leave the meeting with knowledge, case studies, contacts and resources that help organizations develop collaborations and programs that address the social determinants of health – within the community. For more information, go to http://nationalmeeting.practicalplaybook.org/.

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For the last year my firm has worked with the team from A Practical Playbook to build awareness around the understanding that population health improvement needs to be driven by collaboration between primary care and public health. The separation of primary care and public health in the United States has been damaging and self-perpetuating. Given all that we need to achieve within the healthcare arena, we cannot keep working in silos; there is so much to be gained from collaboration. Here’s a link to the Storify of a recent #HCLDR Twitter Chat on the subject that was moderated by Brian Castrucci, one of The Practical Playbook editors.

The big news is that The Practical Playbook – until now primarily an online resource – is now available as book, in paper or electronic form. The Practical Playbook offers professionals in primary care and public health a roadmap to integrating their work with the larger goals of population health.

Comprising case studies, practical recommendations, data resources, and commentaries from national leaders on both sides, The Practical Playbook is the new benchmark for primary care and public health practitioners working to improve population health. The book gives clear guidance to clinicians on how to find and work effectively with community partners, and advice to public health practitioners on how to find the key leaders and work effectively with clinical groups.

To visit Oxford University Press and purchase the book, use this link.

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