Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘population health management’

Screen Shot 2016-05-02 at 11.47.25 AMJust last week, one of my firm’s clients, The Practical Playbook, launched a LinkedIn Group dedicated to the sharing of resources and facilitation of conversations around population health improvement. The group is titled: “Working Together for Population Health.” For those of you who now work at hospitals and health systems across the country, population health management is in our future, and is a reality today for many of us. Here’s the group description from LinkedIn:

“Public health and primary care are natural, foundational partners for addressing the challenges in today’s health system. Together, along with other partners, we can improve population health. The Practical Playbook will share guidance and lead discussions to advance population health partnerships.”

I invite you to head over to the LinkedIn Group and introduce yourself. We look forward to your input. By joining the discussion group, you will:

  • Find practical, actionable advice to help you identify potential partners and implement projects
  • Ask questions and share resources with a diverse group of colleagues
  • Read the latest thought leadership from collaboration experts
  • Connect with colleagues and gain insight into other sectors

 

Read Full Post »

Earlier this week I wrote a post about Duke University School of Medicine’s new Center for Population Health Sciences. My premise was that, as healthcare marketers, we are all going to be in the population health promotion business sooner or later. So we need to start paying attention!

Screen Shot 2016-03-15 at 3.01.18 PMTo that end, my team and I have front row seats on the population health management express. We’ve spent the last year working with The Practical Playbook, a collaboration of the De Beaumont Foundation, the CDC, and Duke’s Department of Community and Family Medicine. The Practical Playbook exists to encourage, inform and facilitate collaboration between public health organizations and healthcare organizations (hospitals, health systems, primary care providers) with the ultimate goal of positively impacting population health. This spring the Practical Playbook is holding its first ever National Meeting, May 22 – 24, at the Hyatt Regency, Bethesda, MD.

“The Practical Playbook National Meeting will be a milestone event towards advancing robust collaborations that improve population health. By bringing together key stakeholders from across sectors – representing professional associations, community organizations, government agencies and academic institutions – the National Meeting will help to catalyze a national movement, accelerate collaborations by fostering skill development, and connect like-minded individuals and organizations to facilitate the exchange of ideas to drive population health improvement.” (National Meeting Website)

My belief is that this conference will spend more time on the “how” of population health management through collaboration, rather than the “why.”  Attendees should leave the meeting with knowledge, case studies, contacts and resources that help organizations develop collaborations and programs that address the social determinants of health – within the community. For more information, go to http://nationalmeeting.practicalplaybook.org/.

Read Full Post »

Screen Shot 2016-03-14 at 3.18.40 PMIf you’re not actively involved in promoting and supporting population health management programs today, you most likely will be in the near future. The day will soon come when healthcare marketers work to develop communication programs that help keep patients out of the hospital while connecting them to ongoing care resources. Trust me, it is coming. For many of you, that day has already arrived.

As evidence of this movement (as if you needed evidence), Duke University School of Medicine has announced the launch of its new Center for Population Health Sciences in the School of Medicine. The center will be led by Lesley Curtis, PhD, professor in the Department of Medicine and director of the Center for Pragmatic Health Services Research in the Duke Clinical Research Institute (DCRI).

According to the announcement, posted on the Duke School of Medicine Blog:

“The goal of the Center for Population Health Sciences is to identify determinants of health and the most effective means for improving health. This multi-disciplinary center will comprise faculty members from a variety of disciplines including epidemiology, health services research and policy, health economics, health measurement and behavior, and implementation science who share an interest in answering complex questions about the drivers of health in populations. The center will foster active collaborations with the Duke Margolis Center for Health Policy, the Duke Global Health Institute, the Center for Community and Population Health Improvement, the Duke Clinical Research Institute, the Duke University Health System, and other entities engaged in the science of population health. “

Along with the Center’s research initiatives, there are plans for the development of new educational programs including a post-graduate certificate program in Population Health Sciences and Master and PhD programs in Population Health Sciences. From my perspective, these educational programs are absolutely necessary if we are going to adapt successfully to the new reality within healthcare. The next generation of clinicians need to understand that successfully addressing population health involves taking on the social determinants of health – and that can’t be done entirely within the walls of the hospital or medical office. As I’ve mentioned in past blog posts, to improve the health of various populations, health systems are going to have to partner effectively with public health and community organizations. Health systems will be challenged address food deserts, safe housing, violence and lack of transportation – all factors that impact health. By collaborating with community organizations, we can help to identify and address those upstream determinants of health.

Read Full Post »

Screen Shot 2015-10-27 at 11.05.14 AM

Screen Shot 2015-10-28 at 2.45.57 PM

For the last year my firm has worked with the team from A Practical Playbook to build awareness around the understanding that population health improvement needs to be driven by collaboration between primary care and public health. The separation of primary care and public health in the United States has been damaging and self-perpetuating. Given all that we need to achieve within the healthcare arena, we cannot keep working in silos; there is so much to be gained from collaboration. Here’s a link to the Storify of a recent #HCLDR Twitter Chat on the subject that was moderated by Brian Castrucci, one of The Practical Playbook editors.

The big news is that The Practical Playbook – until now primarily an online resource – is now available as book, in paper or electronic form. The Practical Playbook offers professionals in primary care and public health a roadmap to integrating their work with the larger goals of population health.

Comprising case studies, practical recommendations, data resources, and commentaries from national leaders on both sides, The Practical Playbook is the new benchmark for primary care and public health practitioners working to improve population health. The book gives clear guidance to clinicians on how to find and work effectively with community partners, and advice to public health practitioners on how to find the key leaders and work effectively with clinical groups.

To visit Oxford University Press and purchase the book, use this link.

Read Full Post »

Late last week I was contacted by Matthew Raynor of the Institute for Health Technology Transformation. He is trying to get the word out about a new research report they are releasing today titled: “A Roadmap for Provider-Based Automation in a New Era of Healthcare.” The research project was done in collaboration with an impressive array of healthcare thought leaders including Alide Chase, MS, Senior Vice President for Quality and Service, Kaiser Permanente; Robert Fortini, Vice President and Chief Clinical Officer, Bon Secours Health System; Connie White Delaney, PhD, RN, School of Nursing Professor & Dean, Academic Health Center Director, Associate Director of Biomedical Health Informatics, and Acting Director of the Institute for Health Informatics, University of Minnesota; Richard Hodach, MD, MPH, PhD, Chief Medical Officer, Phytel; Paul Grundy, MD, MPH, Global Director of Healthcare Transformation, IBM; Margaret O’Kane, President, National Committee for Quality Assurance; Andy Steele, MD, MPH, Director of Medical Informatics, Denver Health; and Dan Fetterolf, Principal, Fetterolf Healthcare Consulting.

The Institute for Health Technology Transformation released findings from its Automating Population Health Research Project today, which seeks to educate the healthcare industry on how best to apply technology in meeting the challenges of population health management.  The report finds that population health management requires healthcare providers to develop new skill sets and new infrastructures for delivering care. To make the transition from fee-for-service reimbursement to accountable care, which depends on the ability to improve population health, providers will need to automate many routine tasks, ranging from identification of care gaps and risk stratification to patient engagement, care management, and outcomes measurement.

For more information about the Automating Population Health Management Research Project, go to http://ihealthtran.com/PopulationHealth.html. Beginning today, the report will be available for download from the Institute for Health Technology Transformation website at no cost.

Read Full Post »

%d bloggers like this: