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Posts Tagged ‘Build Health Challenge’

Innovative partnerships among hospitals, public  health departments, and community organizations are addressing root causes of local health problems, according to a new report from Advisory Board that outlines best practices from 18 communities that have begun forming effective coalitions under the BUILD Health Challenge.

By 2019, Medicare and Medicaid reforms will affect physician payments based on resource use and total costs of care, prompting hospitals and health systems to focus more strongly than ever on community health as a whole. According to research published in The New England Journal of Medicine, up to 80-90% of health status is attributable to factors other than clinical care. The vast majority of physicians cite socioeconomic conditions such as lower income or education, environmental hazards, and lack of access to healthy food, safe housing, and transportation as leading directly to poorer health outcomes, but only 20% of physicians are confident in their ability to address these problems, according to a study conducted on behalf of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

Hospitals and health systems have struggled to build partnerships that would improve health outcomes and generate significant savings. The new report – Building the Business Case for Community Partnership: Lessons from the BUILD Health Challenge – identifies four critical steps to promote population health management and collaboration across the continuum of care: strongly engage hospital or health system leadership; prioritize initial focus on a subset of initiatives that will be iterated; strengthen partnerships to build on the skillsets, relationships, data, or tools each partner brings; and design seamless screening and referral protocols.

The BUILD initiative, cofounded by Advisory Board to promote partnerships that are Bold, Upstream, Integrated, Local, and Data-Driven, started with grants to 18 communities in 2015. This analysis of the 18 funded communities reinforced the belief that transforming health outcomes requires a carefully coordinated effort to eliminate silos.

The report found that engaging hospital or health system leadership helps garner the executive buy-in and secure the resources needed for success. Since many health care organizations have multiple initiatives occurring at once, the report suggests that hospital and health system leaders recognize that the process is an iterative one and begin by focusing on a few prioritized services.

The research also found that successful initiatives leveraged the unique strengths of community organizations to extend the reach of the health care team. The recommended final step – design seamless screening and referral protocols – helps health care providers ensure timely follow-through, which also improves patient and provider satisfaction.

Data demonstrate the need for such coordinated efforts to address “upstream” health factors. For example, while people are 2.9 times as likely to have poor overall health if they are members of a food-insecure household, evidence shows that programmatic approaches can help.  Research from the Center for Effective Government showed that every $1 spent on Meals on Wheels produced $50 in Medicaid savings. Similarly, offering housing and supportive services to high-cost homeless individuals produces an annual per-person health care savings of $8,000, according to a study in Health Affairs.

BUILD Health Challenge Open for New Grant Applications
The BUILD Health Challenge will fund additional grants for at least 17 more communities in 2017. The Round 1 application period for funding closes on February 21. Interested hospitals and health systems can attend informational webinars on December 12 or 15 or January 31.

 

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Screen Shot 2016-07-07 at 12.20.49 PMI’ve written about the BUILD Health Challenge in the past. You can see my prior post by clicking here. The BUILD Health Challenge is an initiative designed to foster and expand meaningful partnerships among health systems, community-based organizations, local health departments, and other organizations that impact health in the community.

The Advisory Board Company, the de Beaumont Foundation, the Colorado Health Foundation, The Kresge Foundation, and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation have teamed up to improve community health and promote health equity through this effort. Overall, they seek to catalyze meaningful progress toward total population health. An important aspect of this effort is addressing the upstream factors that impact health. Often referred to as the social determinants of health, they include factors as diverse as early childhood development, economic opportunity, regulation and policy, the built environment, transportation and infrastructure, educational attainment, public safety, and housing.

While attending the Practical Playbook’s National Meeting in May, several participants in the BUILD Health Challenge (grantees) were recorded on video, speaking about their local initiatives. These videos do an amazing job capturing the essence of the BUILD Health Challenge. The examples of collaboration to improve the health of populations within these communities are outstanding. It is also great to hear how these organizations are directly addressing the social determinants of health! The first time I viewed these videos I knew that I would want to share a few of them on my blog. So, here you go.

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Screen Shot 2015-01-05 at 5.12.25 PMThe BUILD Health Challenge is a national award program designed to foster improved health through community, health system, and public health collaboration. http://www.buildhealthchallenge.org. The awards are designed to strengthen collaborations among hospitals, nonprofits, local health departments, and other community organizations to improve the health of low-income neighborhoods within cities with populations greater than 150,000. This award program brings together a prestigious group of funding partners in The Advisory Board Company, the de Beaumont Foundation, The Kresge Foundation, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and The Colorado Health Foundation. Other partners include the California Health Foundation, Duke University, Housing Partnership Network, Prevention Institute and the University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute.

Here’s the big news for all of us working in healthcare: BUILD Health plans to award up to $8.5 million in grants, low-interest loans, and program-related investments over two years. Awards will support up to 17 community-driven initiatives addressing health-shaping factors that individuals can’t control – such as neighborhood safety or the availability of fresh foods. As they state on the BUILD Health website,

“Recognizing that health starts long before illness, in our neighborhoods, homes, schools, and jobs, the BUILD Health Challenge will award grants to collaborative partnerships that are making community conditions more conducive to health for everyone within a particular neighborhood, not just certain individuals.”

Awards: The BUILD Health Challenge is offering two types of awards: Planning Awards and Implementation Awards. Planning Awards will offer up to $75,000 to awardees for one year with the potential for an additional year of funding if certain criteria can be met. Implementation Awards are available for up to $250,000 and will have two-year duration. For more detail, visit the BUILD Health Website.

Deadline: Round 1 applications are due January 16, 2015. To access the application and learn more, click here. Although, as I noted above, a collaboration will be funded (local nonprofits, health departments, and hospital systems), it is important to note that the nonprofit community organization will be the recipient of the monetary award and will therefore likely serve as the lead applicant.

Below is the BUILD Health Challenge infographic. If you click on the image you can view it at full size. To download the infographic, click here.

Build_Health_IG_Infographic

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