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(File this post under shameless self-promotion.) One of the people I enjoy connecting with when I attend healthcare marketing conferences is Michele von Dambrowski, publisher of eHealthcare Strategy & Trends. I’ve known Michele for a number of years and she has graciously attended several of my presentations. Recently, Michele and her editor, Mark Gothberg, approached me about writing an article for eHealthcare Strategy & Trends.  The topic they wanted me to cover was “crowdsourcing among hospitals and health plans.” I’ve been intrigued by crowdsourcing and jumped at the opportunity. My article is included in the March 2012 issue of the publication.

As part of my research for the article, I was fortunate to interview Lee Aase, Director of Mayo Clinic’s Center for Social Media, Miles Appel, Director of Internal Web Capability for Kaiser Permanente, and Andrew Keen, author of The Cult of the Amateur. (If you aren’t familiar with Andrew Keen, you should definitely check him out. He is a fascinating individual.) Even better, bear in mind that this is an article about crowdsourcing in healthcare, I was able to integrate a quote from Alexander Hamilton, one of the political philosophers whose thinking informed the development of our form of government. In the end, it was a lot of fun researching and writing this article. Organizations like Mayo Clinic, Kaiser Permanente, Blue Cross Blue Shield of North Carolina, and the Harvard Clinical and Translational Science Center are innovating through the use of crowdsourcing programs.  I definitely invite you to learn more about crowdsourcing in healthcare, and , if you have time, to read the article. If you don’t subscribe to eHealthcare Strategy & Trends, you can learn more about the publication by clicking here.

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As I mentioned in a prior post, one highlight of the Mayo Ragan Health Care Social Media Summit was definitely the patient panel. The panel was titled “The power of the e-patient.” Katherine Leon and Laura Haywood-Cory spoke powerfully about their experiences as survivors of spontaneous coronary artery dissections (SCAD), and their efforts to network with and organize other women who had survived SCAD. In the end, their efforts lead to patient initiated research (a new buzz phrase) at Mayo Clinic. This is a remarkable story about the patient’s ability to impact the research agenda. If you’d like to read more about this, there’s an excellent Wall Street Journal article titled “When Patients Band Together.” Every conference like this should find a way to put the patient in the foreground! Congratulations to the folks behind the Mayo Ragan gathering who had the vision to make this happen.

In a strange coincidence, John Novack, the Communications Director at Inspire (http://www.inspire.com), contacted me more than a week ago to share a report he has written titled The SCAD Ladies Stand Up: Stories of Patient Empowerment. If you’re not familiar with Inspire, it is a network of online patient communities. You can download the report by clicking this link: http://bit.ly/n4PK1K. Below is an excerpt from Inspre’s special report.

“This special report is not intended to delve into the Mayo Clinic SCAD project itself. The Wall Street Journal, Mayo itself, and other media have covered that topic well. Rather, through first-person narratives of patients, this is a closer look at how several members of the WomenHeart Support Community on Inspire banded together and started something special. We also solicited the perspectives of newer members, who found the community through online searching and the publicity from the announcement of the Mayo project. While Katherine and Laura are from the US, SCAD Ladies are from the UK, Canada, New Zealand, Sweden, and elsewhere. As Laura wrote in her essay (see p. 15 of the report), “Online tools and social media can help create a patient community that spans countries and oceans, and with that support backing you up, reach out to the people who can research your condition.”

Although it seems odd to say, too often healthcare marketers and communicators have neglected the patient (and the physician). Social media has empowered patients and will continue to do so in ways we may not expect. It is clear from the example of the Katherine Leon, Laura Haywood-Cory and the SCAD ladies, it’s time to tune in and pay attention. I urge you to read the report from Inspire.com.

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There were elements of this day that left me breathless. Literally. This is what healthcare communicators need. Patient panels. Physician panels. Singing presenters. Pediatrician bloggers. Does it get any better than that?

One highlight of Day Two of the Mayo Ragan Health Care Social Media Summit was definitely the patient panel. The panel was titled “The power of the e-patient.” Katherine Leon and Laura Haywood-Cory spoke powerfully about their experiences as survivors of spontaneous coronary artery dissections (SCAD), and their efforts to network with and organize other women who had survived SCAD. In the end, their efforts lead to patient initiated research (a new buzz phrase) at Mayo Clinic. This is a remarkable story about the patient’s ability to impact the research agenda. If you’d like to read more about this, there’s an excellent Wall Street Journal article titled “When Patients Band Together.” Every conference like this should find a way to put the patient in the foreground! Congratulations to the folks behind the Mayo Ragan gathering who had the vision to make this happen.

I had been waiting in anticipation to see Wendy Sue Swanson, MD (@seattlemamadoc) present. She was amazing. One of her most important messages was the value of social media as a set of tools for LISTENING. Yes, listening. It is not just about spewing information. It is not advertising. We can use these tools to learn more about the constituents we serve. The audience was captivated by Dr. Swanson and gave her a standing ovation! Here’s a brief taste of the reaction on Twitter:

Another highlight was my friend Chris Boyer playing ukelele and singing his social media ROI rag at the end of his presentation. Here’s Chris Boyer’s social media music video (while you watch this, please remember that Chris was a math major):

Finally, yesterday I published a list of 20 people you should meet while attending the conference (Mayo Ragan Health Care Social Media Summit). Well, here are a few more folks you might want to meet today!

It’s been a great gathering. My thanks to every at Mayo Clinic and Ragan Communications for making this possible.

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The Mayo Ragan Health Care Social Media Summit is the perfect place for networking and meeting industry thought leaders. One of the things you’ll discover is that these social media experts are very much approachable. Not that you really need it (based on the networking last night at the cocktail reception), but I encourage you to take the time to introduce yourself to these professionals and engage them in conversation.

Here’s my list of 20 people you should meet while you’re here:

  1. @LeeAase – Lee Aase, Mayo Clinic
  2. @HiveDan – Dan Hinmon, Hive Strategies
  3. @HealthBlawg – David Harlow, Attorney Extraordinaire
  4. @Jamieverkamp – Jamie Verkamp, (e)merge
  5. @edbennett - Ed Bennett
  6. @hjluks – Howard Luks, MD
  7. @RaganReporter – Jessica Levco – Ragan Healthcare Editor
  8. @ReedSmith – Reed Smith
  9. @KSkipperFoster - Kari Skipper Foster – Corrigan Partners
  10. @endogoddess – Jen Dyer, MD, MPH
  11. @ChrisBoyer – Chris Boyer, Inova Health
  12. @westr – Robert (Bob) West, SUNY Update Medical University
  13. @RichmondDoc – Mark Ryan, MD
  14. @subatomicdoc – Matt Katz, MD
  15. @DrMikeSevilla – Mike Sevilla, MD
  16. @shelholtz – Shel Holtz
  17. @ctsinclair – Christian Sinclair, MD
  18. @SeattleMamaDoc – Wendy Sue Swanson, MD
  19. @RyanSquire – Ryan Squire, Kindred Health
  20. @ahynes1 – Aldon Hynes

This list is just the beginning. There are so many smart, engaging people to meet. And, of course, you can find me: @dandunlop. If you see me wandering the halls, please come up and say hello.

Enjoy the conference!

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Yesterday one of the health systems I work with generated big news by landing a Mayo Clinic executive as its new president. This doesn’t happen everyday, so I have decided to share the news via my blog. Here’s the news that we released yesterday:

University Health Systems of Eastern Carolina announced today that Dr. David Herman, a physician leader with the Mayo Clinic, will join UHS as president of the health care system.

Herman currently serves as medical director of the Mayo Clinic Affiliated Practice Network. As UHS president, Herman will be responsible for the health system, including coordinating and integrating health care at all levels of service, from free community screenings and physician practices to local hospitals and tertiary medical care.

Dave McRae, chief executive officer of UHS, said the organization has been moving for some time toward a more integrated system of health care delivery, and Herman will lead that integration.

“Dr. Herman has experience in building a mature, integrated health care delivery system,” McRae said. “His leadership at one of the world’s premier health care systems will guide us as we prepare for this new world of health care for eastern North Carolina.”

Herman has significant expertise and experience consolidating and integrating physician practice networks, developing formal relationships with national and regional provider groups and building operational structures to serve those relationships.

As director of the Employee and Community Health Program at Mayo Clinic Rochester, Herman worked to develop programs in the community and in the public school system that address chronic illnesses and diseases.

Herman currently is a consultant in ophthalmology at Mayo Clinic and a professor of ophthalmology in the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine. He has more than 90 peer-reviewed publications and served as a principle investigator for an NIH grant studying ocular hypertension and glaucoma.

Herman said his decision to relocate to eastern North Carolina was based on great potential to unify a system of care that will be critical in the coming years.

“Few organizations are in the unique position of being able to build a true system of care to address the care needs of the populations they serve,” Herman said. “I am impressed with the people who make up UHS, and I am eager to work with the team to design, execute and demonstrate this new system of health care. I am honored and eager to have a chance to serve in this new capacity.”

Herman currently serves on the board of directors for the Mayo Health System, the board of directors for the Western Region of the Mayo Health System, and is a member of the management team of Mayo Clinic. Herman also served as chair of the Mayo Clinic Rochester Clinical Practice Committee, an executive position similar to the role he will assume at UHS.

He currently serves on the board of directors and the Strategy and Personnel Committees for the Institute of Clinical Systems Improvement, directing the development of guidelines and protocols of care for preventive services, acute and chronic care.

Herman was recently named to the board of trustees of Ronald McDonald House Charities, the international charity that sponsors and supports Ronald McDonald Houses worldwide.

Herman is a native of International Falls, Minn. He received his bachelor’s degree in physiology from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and his medical degree from Mayo Medical School in Rochester, Minn. He completed his residency in ophthalmology at the Mayo School of Graduate Medical Education and was senior staff fellow at the National Eye Institute, National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Md. In 2000, he received a master’s degree in medical management from the University of Texas-Dallas.

McRae said Herman will join UHS in summer 2011.

University Health Systems of Eastern Carolina Inc., a mission-driven, not-for-profit corporation, owns, leases or has a majority membership interest in seven eastern North Carolina hospitals and has management agreements with one other. UHS includes Albemarle Health, Bertie Memorial Hospital, Chowan Hospital, Duplin General Hospital, Heritage Hospital, Outer Banks Hospital, Pitt County Memorial Hospital, Roanoke-Chowan Hospital, University Home Health and Hospice; ViQuest and physician practices, and is affiliated with the Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University. On the web at www.uhseast.com.

Post by Dan Dunlop, The Healthcare Marketer

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Uri Neren recently authored a blog post for the Harvard Business Review about the Mayo Clinic’s future as an innovator. I encourage you all to read the post here: http://blogs.hbr.org/cs/2010/10/how_the_mayo_clinic_invests_in.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+harvardbusiness+%28HBR.org%29. For those of you not familiar with Uri, he is “the CEO of Generate Companies, which founded The World Database of Innovation initiative, a collaboration with several universities to profile the world’s innovation leaders and commonalities amongst successful innovators.” Uri also leads Innovation Peers, a global network of peer groups for chief innovators.

According to the author, “as embedded as innovation is in its DNA, Mayo realizes it can’t count on sustaining its edge without some key structures to ensure that the necessary conditions for innovation are met.” Uri’s post describes how the Mayo Clinic is fostering innovation in the new century. When it comes to future innovation, nothing is taken for granted. Uri outlines several aspects of Mayo’s innovation infrastructure, including unofficial activity, external collaboration, internal connectivity, combination innovation, resourcing and preconception awareness. Mayo stands as one of the largest and most respected care organizations in the world.

For more, definitely check out the story in the Harvard Business Review: http://blogs.hbr.org/cs/2010/10/how_the_mayo_clinic_invests_in.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+harvardbusiness+%28HBR.org%29.

Post by Dan Dunlop with Stephanie Cohen, UNC-Chapel Hill Student and Jennings Intern

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Terrific presentation this morning by Lee Aase of the Mayo Clinic today at the Virginia Society for Healthcare Marketing and Public Relations (VSHMPR) Conference.

“This openness and level of communication is not going to change.”

Lee’s message: If the values of your organization are not aligned with this, then your values need to change. This is the new reality!

If you’d like to view Lee’s presentation, he posted it to SlideShare at http://tinyurl.com/2cu9nwt.

Below are screen shots of part of the Twitter feed that occurred during Lee’s presentation. I was encouraged by the number of people tweeting. It is a big change from last year when I attended this same conference.


Post by Dan Dunlop, The Healthcare Marketer

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